Click on any image below to learn more about each initiative.

Student Centered Pedagogies Of Engagement

A) Genetics K322 Peer Recitation

The Department of Biology (Britt Reese, Mariah Judd, and Kathy Marrs) has long realized the benefit of undergraduate peer mentoring on success of students in Gateway Courses (typically large enrollment introductory courses for majors or non-majors). Peer mentoring is generously supported in 5 such courses each semester in the department of Biology, reaching over 2,500 students each fall and spring semester. However, no corresponding peer mentoring exists for Genetics K322, the next required course for all 2,000 biology majors in the School of Science. Enrollment of this course has steadily increased over the last 5 years, with enrollments exceeding 130 students in a single lecture section now common for the fall semester and just over 100 in the spring. This past fall 2011 and spring 2012, a peer leader was hired to provide extra time and problem solving assistance to all genetics students, with up to 10 hours per week of time available for drop-in-mentoring hours.

Major findings include
During the fall semester, at least 48 students (36%) attended one or more mentoring sessions, similar to the attendance in the spring. There was a modest decrease in the DFW rate in Genetics in both the fall and spring (from an average rate of 16% in the previous 5 years  before  the  introduction  of  mentoring  to  about  14%  in  the  past  two  semesters  with mentoring). It is difficult to say whether this modest benefit was a result of the peer mentoring, but due to the difficulty of the genetics course, student evaluations and focus group comments were overwhelmingly positive of the benefits of the extra support. The two faculty members teaching the course were also highly positive and have requested that the mentoring continue, both stating that they will promote the benefits of attending the peer mentored sessions to the Genetics students this coming fall and spring.

B) Chemistry C341: First Semester Organic Chemistry Workshop Series

During the first two years (2010–2012), the Department of Chemistry (Pratibha Varma-Nelson,
Sarah Beth Wilson, and Robert Minto) continued their development and implementation of the workshop series into the first semester organic chemistry course in order to lower the DFW rate. The primary goal of  implementing the Organic Chemistry Workshop  Series is to facilitate students’ collaborative development of Organic Chemistry problem-solving skills, as measured by performance on an ACS Organic Chemistry Exam and survey data. In order to achieve this, a modified Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) workshop series was instituted as a component of the first semester Organic Chemistry course. The peer leaders elicit the participation of all group members,  challenge  students  to  expand  their  conceptual  understanding  through  Socratic dialogue, share insights from being reflective on their problem-solving processes, and encourage students to explain their new understanding of concepts to one another in their small group during these 75-minutes workshops. Answer keys are not provided to students since it would short-circuit the process of discussing the fundamental principles and nuances of each workshop problem.

  • Group Assignment: Eight to ten students of mixed ability are assigned a peer leader for the duration of the semester. Each peer leader, who divides their students into smaller groups of four to five students, facilitates each small group’s discussion of the weekly problem sets.
  • Training of Leaders:Peer leaders are trained weekly in preparation for the workshops. These weekly training meetings consist of a discussion of helpful techniques to uncover and remediate common misconceptions pertaining to the weekly problem set concepts, ways to use graphic organizers or model kits to facilitate conceptual understanding, and methods to enhance student collaboration.

Evaluation
Three hundred three undergraduate first semester Organic Chemistry students were impacted during the 2011-2012 academic year from the previous I-STEM funding, with DFW rates of 15.5% (Fall) and 18.6% (Spring), as compared to DFW rates ranging from 23-30% prior to the workshops being implemented. Moreover, 50% (Fall) to 66% (Spring) of students state that the workshop  discussions  aided  understanding,  while  forty  (Fall)  to  sixty  (Spring)  percent  of students  perceived  an  increase  in  their  problem-solving  ability  from  involvement  in  the workshops. This I-STEM grant enabled smaller group sizes, thus better matching the PLTL model, increasing the student perceptions of the impact of the workshops on their learning, and bolstering performance on the ACS Organic Chemistry final exam. In addition to the benefits of workshop involvement for the students, each of the sixteen peer leaders cited an increase in their understanding of Organic Chemistry concepts and more than 25% of the peer leaders expressed an interest in teaching as a career or as part of their career as a result of their participation in the workshop series.

During the third year (2012–13), the funding will provide a means for the revision of workshop materials to align with the new textbook as well as consider feedback from students. Secondly, there will be further development of the peer leader training curriculum. Lastly, the pattern of lower attendance at the Friday 9am workshop sessions is motivating an exploration of new workshop times to better suit student needs.

Major findings include

  1. the DFW rates have decreased about 10% after workshops were implemented
  2. 6 to 10% increase in positive student perception of problem-solving ability
  3. 25% of the peer mentors expressed an interest in teaching after this experience
  4. study findings to date suggest that faculty have been successful in using the PLTL approach to lower the failure rates in the workshops (see Figure 1 that provides a historical summary of DFW rates for fall semesters using workshops). Reduction of DFW rates for the chemistry course and training of additional discussion leaders (using the PLTL model) to decrease the number of students in each workshop are positive interventions for increasing the success and number of STEM graduates.

C) Calculus Course Redesign with Recitations

Calculus recitations were developed and implemented into the large lecture section of MATH
16500 (fall semesters) and 16600 (spring semesters). Recitations became a required component of the course and graduate students were trained on how to facilitate discussions using peer- mentoring techniques used in the Mathematics Assistance Center. Students in all sections of the course (with or without required recitations) are required to take a departmental final exam with fixed grading curve.  The following data compares the DFW rate of students in sections of the course that have recitations to those that do not.

MATH 16500 (fall semester only)

 

 

2009-10 2010-11 2011-12

No Rec 

# Students (Sections)

281(6)

289 (5)

283 (5)

No Rec

DFW Rate

33%

32%

39%

Rec

# Students (Sections)

101 (1)

98 (1)

100 (1)

Rec

DFW Rate

25%

26%

21%

 

MATH 166000 (spring semester only)

 

 

2009-10 2010-11 2011-12

No Rec 

# Students (Sections)

175 (4)

183 (3)

172 (4)

No Rec

DFW Rate

40%

41%

33%

Rec

# Students (Sections)

95 (1)

106 (1)

97 (1)

Rec

DFW Rate

23%

20%

20%

 

The following data compares the performance of students in sections of calculus with and without  recitations in  MATH  16500  on  the  departmental final  exam  during  the  fall  2011 semester. The departmental final exam is commonly administered and commonly graded.

Fall 2011 MATH 16500

 

With Recitations No Recitations   Combined

Number of Sections

1

5

6

Number Enrolled

100

283

383

Number Taking Final

82

183

265

Mean Score

72.2

61.7

65.6

Median Score

78

65

67

% of Students No Show

18%

35%

31%

 

Major findings include:

  1. despite the larger class size, sections of calculus with recitation sections have a significantly lower DFW rate, ~20%, than other sections of the course.
  2. Students in sections of calculus with recitations perform 10 percentage points better on the departmental final exam.

D) PhyLS - the Physics Learning Space

The Department of Physics is committed to advancing student success in all of our introductory courses. To this end, we will implement a new effort to provide mentoring services to all students taking these courses. These courses are required by many majors, and are considered to be difficult by many students. As a result, these courses often create barriers to retention and graduation. There are six relevant courses organized into three two-semester sequences (PHYS 218/219, P201/P202, and 152/251). Combined, these courses serve almost 1500 students during each academic year. The enrollments for 2010–11 are shown in Table I as an illustration.

Representative enrollment and student success in introductory physics classes

2010-11 Enrollment

Course Fall day Fall night Spring day Spring night Summer day Course totals Credit
Hours
DFW
Rate*

218

N

95

N

72

47

214

856

21%

219

N

33

N

36

25

94

376

22%

P201

139

N

N

105

99

343

1715

30%

P202

N

71

81

N

68

220

1100

11%

152

117

N

140

35

53

345

1380

35%

251

108

34

70

N

55

267

1335

22%

Semester totals

364

254

309

276

347

1483

6762

25.1%

*DFW rates represent the percentage of students who withdraw from a class, or receive a grade of D or F. The figures given are averages for the period Fall 2004 through Fall 2008. The final entry in this column is the average of the figures above, weighted by total enrollment.

In order to reduce our DFW rates, the Physics Department will adopt the “assistance center” model that has proven successful in Mathematics, Psychology, Chemistry and Biology. In this center, students will be able to interact with mentors and faculty in small groups or one-on-one.

They will be able to focus specifically on the areas that cause them the most trouble, and receive individual support. They will also have guided access to computer simulations, video analysis software, and other online tools that support learning in physics.

Completed  Work
Mentoring  will  occur  in  the  newly  established  Physics  Learning  Space, “PhyLS” for short. During spring 2012, the physics department (Andy Gavrin and other physics faculty) renovated a small space (~225 square feet) for this purpose, and the PhyLS will open with the beginning of the fall semester, 2012. We have also established an assessment plan, in collaboration with Dr. Howard Mzumara of the IUPUI Testing Center. Under this plan we will track usage of the PhyLS by students in each of the affected courses using a sign-in sheet. We will also use the sign in data to identify random samples of students who will be asked to participate in a survey, and a smaller sample of students who will be asked to participate in a focus group. Both of these methods will be used to provide formative assessment of the PhyLS and its services during the first year of operation. A summative review will be undertaken after two years.

Major findings include
None to report at this time. The learning center will open fall of 2012, and will report first year findings in year three report.

E) Faculty Development Workshops
During the first and second years (2010–12), the School of Engineering and Technology (Charlie Feldhaus and Stephen Hundley) have disseminated results and best practices in STEM education on-campus  through  faculty  development workshops, called E&T Lunch-n-Learn Series on STEM Best Practices. These workshops are well attended and held twice a semester.

Career Services

CI-STEP is dedicated to the success of IUPUI students beyond the university; through services such as the School of Science Career Development center and programs such as new and exciting internship opportunities.

Student Success

A) STEM Summer Bridge and Resident Programs

During the first year (2010–11), the School of Engineering and Technology and the School of Science (Terri Talbert-Hatch and Melissa Pohlman) developed and implemented a  summer residential STEM bridge program to be held during the two-week period before fall semester begins. The residential bridge program was designed for first-year students that would be housed in Purdue House 1 and 2, and the Women in Science House.

During the second year (summer 2011), 26 first-year students participated in the first STEM bridge program. The selected students had two things in common: 1) they would be living on campus during their first year, and 2) they were majoring in either science, engineering, or technology programs. The bridge program model used by other programs on campus was utilized with two minor changes: 1) we had two sessions with focused on housing and roommate issues, and 2) we extended the course into the semester for 12 weekly, one-hour sessions (typically the classes would only meet for up to five weeks into the fall semester). There were several positives to the residential, multi-disciplinary STEM bridge program. Students living in the same buildings had an opportunity to get to know one another before the semester began and there was more interaction as  the  semester continued. Students in  different schools  had  the  opportunity to interact, which is typically difficult to do during the first year.

There were some issues that we need to work to overcome. Because new students see a variety of advisors  when  attending  orientation  (engineering/technology  new  student  advising  center, university college advising center, and various departmental advisors in Science), it was difficult to get the word out to students about this bridge option. Also, one of the mentors for the class was a senior student who was also living in one of the communities and there seemed to be some rapport conflicts between this mentor and students after the class ended. We also did little outreach to the participants of the class once the semester ended, but plan to do more outreach to these students as they enter their second year on campus. The students also did not appreciate the extended class sessions (12) into the fall semester, since they knew that the other bridge sections did not meet that long. A spinoff of the residential STEM bridge program was an overnight orientation for the next cohort of students that would be living in Purdue House in 2012.

One of the class participants from last year's residential STEM bridge program (2011) will be a student mentor for the 2012 STEM bridge class. A problem that faces bridge programs is finding faculty  willing  to  teach  the  experience during  the  summer. Thus,  the  other  STEM  bridge programs (non-residential) will experiment with increasing the number of STEM majors served by increasing the students to faculty ratio, but lowering the students to student-mentor ratio in the third year (2012–13).

During the third year (summer 2012), it is expected that the number of student participating in STEM bridge programs will increase by 20% per year.

STEM Bridge Program Number of Students
2010
Number of Students
2011
Number of Students
2012

Residential STEM Bridge

0

26

23

Biology Bridge

19

24

29

Science Bridge

24

13

30

Engineering Bridge

22

23

23

Total

65

86

105

 

Major findings include

  1. there was a 32% growth in the number of STEM students taking a STEM bridge course after the first year of the grant, followed by a 22% in the second year.
  2. Although to early to report first year retention and graduation rates, it is expected that students taking bridge will have significantly higher rates than those who did not.
  3. Regarding study findings, the table below shows an extract of preliminary survey results based on the 26 students who participated in the residential STEM Bridge program in 2011. Overall, the favorable ratings (5 = strongly agree) reported in the table are quite promising and encouraging to faculty and students. (See table below)
  4. Recent study findings at IUPUI indicate that overall, bridge participants have higher levels of academic performance compared to non-participants, students participating in Summer Bridge also have lower DFW rates compared to non-participants, and minority students (especially African Americans) who participate in Summer Bridge obtained higher GPAs, lower DFW rates and higher Fall-to-Fall retention rates compared to non-participating African American students. (Detailed results are presented elsewhere in the 2011 Summer Bridge Program Report.)

2011 IUPUI Bridge Program: Summary of the "Residential STEM Bridge" Results

Survey Item
Total

 

N

Mean

Std. Dev.

Participating
 in 
the 
STEM 
Living 
Learning
 Summer 
Bridge 
increased 
the 
degree
 to 
which
 I 
understand
 the 
importance
 of 
pursuing 
a 
major 
in
 the 
STEM 
area.


26

4.54

0.95

Participating
 in 
the 
STEM 
Living 
Learning
 Summer 
Bridge
 increased
 the
 degree
 to 
which
 I 
will
 communicate 
with 
my
 roommates

26

4.23

0.95

Participating
 in 
the 
STEM 
Living 
Learning
 Summer 
Bridge
 increased
 the
 degree
 to 
which 
I
 understand
 the
 benefit 
of 
living 
on
 campus.


26

4.62

0.85

Participating
 in 
the 
STEM 
Living 
Learning
 Summer 
Bridge included beneficial interaction with other housing residents


26

4.62

0.90

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B) Promoting the MATH Minor

During the first year (2010–11), the department of mathematical sciences (Jeffrey Watt) began actively promoting the math minor to students and advisors across campus as a way of setting a short-term goal on the path to completing a BS degree. The department will complete the paperwork and have the registrar post the minor on the transcript at the time of completion (usually at the end of the sophomore year). This documentation on the transcript provides motivation to the student that they have completed a component of their degree (much like an AS to BS degree).  Many STEM majors will automatically have a minor in their plan of study, or will earn the minor by selecting one more MATH or STAT course as an elective. The number of minors awarded each year provides an indicator of the number of STEM majors passing through the midpoint of the pipeline for a STEM degree.

MATH Minors by
S-T-E-M
2008 2009 2010 2011

Science

10

16

7

22

Technology

0

3

3

4

Engineering

27

31

47

81

Computer Science

5

5

8

15

Other

2

3

1

6

Total

44

58

66

128

 

Major findings include:

The number of minors awarded each year have increased 32%, 14%, and 94%.   This rapid growth is partly due to students becoming more aware of their eligibility to obtain the minor, but it is also due to 53 students (of the 128 awarded last year), who took one additional course above their requirement (as a free elective) to qualify for the minor - hence, an indicator of motivation.

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C) Mini-Grants to Target DFW Rates in Specific Engineering and Technology Courses

During  2012,  a  call  for  STEM-oriented curriculum-and-instruction proposals  seeking field- generated ideas that have potential to positively impacting the grant's scope and outcomes was made  (Charlie  Feldhaus  and  Jeffrey  Watt)  to  faculty in the engineering  and  technology departments. Those proposals rated most highly of having promise were funded with mini- grants. The mini-grants funded faculty to work on their proposals during the summer of 2012, and then to implement the curricular and instruction changes in the fall semester.

  • Summer Industrial Projects Program, Robert Durkin – Rekindle Soph/Jr. MET students' desire to become engineers, promote retention and persistence.
  • Using the Inductive Learning Methodology to Reduce Student Failure Rates in MET, Paul Yearling
  • From Studio to Student: e-Mentoring in Computer Graphics Technology, Jan Cowan and Dan Baldwin – Attract, retain new and existing students.
  • Improving  the  Retention  of  Freshman  Engineering  Students  through  Proactive  Peer Mentoring, Stanley Chien – Increase freshman engineering retention by at least 12%
  • Promoting STEM Course via Introductory Videos, Sohel Anwar – Recruit students to major.Transfer Student Recruit and Support, Terri Talbert-Hatch – develop a learning community for IVYTech CC engineering and technology students to take before they  transfer to IUPUI, and a 1.5-day minority transfer orientation program at IUPUI.
  • Alliance for Retention for Multicultural Students (ET-ARMS), Patrick Gee – develop  and implement a first year seminar course for minority students designed to increase minority retention and accelerate time to graduation.

Major findings include:

Too early to report any findings in this report; however, the faculty that received these mini-grants will attend a mid-fall semester meeting to discuss the progress they are making in developing and implementing their student success strategies into the classroom, followed by a presentation to our External Advisory Board in December.

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D) Post Enrollment Requirement Checking (PERC) in MATH Courses

One situation that causes some STEM students to drop out of their intended major is the result of not being successful in the first math course, and then moving onto the next math course, and failing it. These students believe they can pass the next math courses without being successful in the prerequisite, but they end up digging a hole they cannot climb out. After a year of college, these students find that they are more than a year behind in math. This is a situation that the advisor and course instructor find difficult to catch before it is too late - and contributes to lowering the first year retention rate.

During the second year (2012–13), the math department (Kelly Matthews) has worked with the registrars office to develop an automatic withdrawal program that will remove enrolled students in math courses one week before the semester starts if they do not have the proper prerequisites (a prerequisite check). The proper prerequisite is a grade of C or better in the prerequisite math course or an appropriate placement exam score for the course. When the Post Enrollment Check (PREC) is run two weeks before classes start, the identified students are withdrawn from the math course, and the student and their advisor will be automatically notified by email of the situation and what actions need to be taken to register for the prerequisite course.

Major findings include
47 students have been identified as enrolling for a fall 2012 math course without passing the prerequisite course in the spring or summer 2012 semester.

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E) Reaffirm Existing 2+3 Relationship Dual Degree Program with Butler

During the second year (2011–12), we funded a half time advisor to work with other higher education partners to increase advising and promotion of 2+2 or 2+3 engineering and technology programs.

Major findings include
No data has been collected and analyzed at this time to measure the effectiveness of a specialized advisor to work with these partners. We will report on this activity in the third year report.

Articulation with 2 yr. Colleges

A) MATH Articulation Agreement between IUPUI and IVYTech CC

During the first year of the grant (2010), the departments of mathematical sciences at IUPUI (Jeffrey Watt and James Shen) and IVYTech CC (Victor Roeske and Janet Dalzell) reviewed and aligned the content and learning outcome standards in five introductory math courses. IVYTech is the newly established community college of Indiana. The goal of this alignment is to improve the seamless transition of STEM students and future elementary school teachers (who will teach math to future generations) from community college to IUPUI. This work resulted in a signed Course Transfer Agreement between the two institutions. The courses are:

     

Calculus for Technology I

IUPUI MATH 22100

IVYTech MATH 221

Calculus for Technology II
Math for Elementary Education I

IUPUI MATH 22200
IUPUI MATH 13000

IVYTech MATH 222
IVYTech MATH 127

Math for Elementary Education II

IUPUI MATH 13100

IVYTech MATH 128

Math for Elementary Education III

IUPUI MATH 13200

IVYTech MATH 129

 

The number of students by year who have transferred from IVYTech to IUPUI with these courses in the Course Transfer Agreement are:

  • 2008 we had 6 students transfer these courses – Baseline year of grant
  • 2009 we had 11 students transfer these courses
  • 2010 we had 10 students transfer these courses – Year 1 of grant, articulation implemented
  • 2011 we had 85 students transfer these courses – Year 2 of grant

Major findings include
Data on the success of these students at IUPUI is being collected and analyzed, but not ready to report at this time.  But as course articulations are formed, we see a sharp rise in students transferring the courses to IUPUI to continue their education.

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B) Signed / Updated Articulation Agreements in Engineering + Technology with IVYTech

During the first year of the grant (2010–11), the engineering departments at IUPUI (Jie Chin, Yaobin Chin, and Nancy Lamm) and IVYTech CC (Mike deBourbon) reviewed and aligned program content and standards for learning outcomes; and then, signed program articulation agreements  between  IVYTech  CC  and  IUPUI  for  pre-engineering  AS  degrees  at  CC  to Computer, Energy, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering four year programs. A parallel group of faculty (Hundley, Cooney, Fernandez, Bannatyne, and deBourbon) performed a review of technology  courses  and  then  revised  existing  program  articulations  among  the  technology programs.

The number of students by year who have transferred from IVYTech to IUPUI (in all majors) has increased every year. Although we have not yet extracted from the total the number that were STEM related majors, these articulation agreements do effect a significant number of the total.

Year Number of Xfer Students Number of Xfer Credits Average Xfer Credits On Year Retention at IUPUI

2008

2,683

29,517

21.5

61%

2009

2,803

31,519

23.5

68%

2010

3,267

36,839

26.0

70%

2011

3,635

41,300

28.6

na

 

During the fall semester 2011, the number of STEM students at IUPUI who transferred from IVYTech CC was 4,468.  Twice as many transfer students went to engineering and technology majors than science or math majors.

IUPUI School Number of Xfer Students Total Number of Students at IUPUI % of School's Enrollment

Science

235

2,032

11.6%

Engineering and Technology

498

2,436

20.4%

 

Major findings include

  1. We are starting to see more CC students transfer to IUPUI in STEM disciplines, and the articulation agreements in engineering and technology do affect the increase in the number of credits that the students transfer. The quality of the transfer courses from IVYTech CC continue to improve, which better prepares the students to succeed at IUPUI, as evidenced in the one-year retention rates.
  2. IUPUI  students who  previously attended IVYTech CC-Indianapolis is  18%  of  IUPUI's overall undergraduate enrollment. Most  notably these students are  24%  of  IUPUI's  overall undergraduate ethnic diversity in fall of 2011. For the IUPUI STEM majors who previously attended IVYTech CC, they make up 16% of the overall enrollment.
  3. IVYTech CC is without question IUPUI's largest transfer feeder institution. Transfer students from IVYTech as a group transferred more credits than any other external institutions. Moreover, as a result of articulation agreements between the two institutions, approximately 7.7 out of 10 credit  hours  transferred from  the  Indianapolis campus  of  IVYTech are  articulated towards distributed  credits,  that  is,  credits  that  have  been  equated  to  a  specific  IUPUI  course.  In comparison, only about 60% of transferred credit hours are articulated toward specific course credits for students from IUPUI's other major feeder institutions.

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C) MATH AS/AA Degree Program Development at IVYTech CC

During the second year of the grant (2011–12), the department of mathematical sciences at IVYTech CC (Janet Dalzell and Victor Roeske) have been developing and implementing a set of foundational level math courses that are aligned and parallel in rigor to IUPUI courses. This set of courses will form the new associates degree (math cluster) at the CC and will be equivalent to the MATH minor at IUPUI. IVYTech is the newly established community college of Indiana. The goal of this alignment is to improve the seamless transition of STEM students from the community college to IUPUI, and will allow math majors to move directly into the junior year of math BS degree programs (includes: pure, applied, math educ, and actuarial sciences). This work will result in a signed Course Transfer Program Agreement between the two institutions by the end of 2012. The courses that will make up the cluster are:

Course Title IVYTech AS Cluster IUPUI Math Minor

Calculus I
Calculus II

IVYTech MATH 211
IVYTech MATH 212

IUPUI MATH 16500
IUPUI MATH 16600

Multidimensional Math

IVYTech MATH 213

IUPUI MATH 17100

Multivariate Calculus

IVYTech MATH 261

IUPUI MATH 26100

Differential Equations

IVYTech MATH 264

IUPUI MATH 26600

Discrete Math

IVYTech MATH 235

IUPUI MATH 27600

 

The first three courses have now been implemented and students have been registering for the courses. It is expected that all courses in this cluster will be implemented by 2013, and the first associate degrees with this cluster should be awarded this same year with 3 expected students.

  • MATH 211 has had consistent enrollments for the past few years of 50 students.
  • MATH 212 has had growing enrollments for the past few semesters of 5 to 15 students.
  • MATH 213 was first offered in spring 2012 with 12 students.
  • MATH 261+264 will be offered in the next two semesters (2012–13) with 2 to 6 students.

The alignment of the IVYTech CC Math Cluster with the IUPUI Math Minor will allow students a seamless transition between the two institutions.  It is expected that some students will split these courses between the two institutions, and this activity will be tracked by IUPUI.

Major findings include
The first cohort was expected to have 2 or 3 students, and there are actually 6. The second cohort has 12 students - double that of the first cohort. We expect to have the first cohort receive their AS/AA degrees with the math cluster in 2013, and then transfer to IUPUI as a math major (or other STEM related major).

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